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Salisbury Conservation News

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Complete Wildlife Tally

Salisbury's vertebrate wildlife species, tallied and not yet tallied

Salisbury's vertebrate wildlife species, tallied and not yet tallied Click to enlarge

Jim Andrews has gone through the results of Salisbury’s 2010 Wildlife Tally and compiled lists of all the species that were observed and those that we might have missed.  The year-long tally of 203 species included 31 mammals, 136 birds, 6 reptiles, 16 amphibians, and 15 fishes.  Lists of all the species can be seen in the posts that immediately precede this one (they appear lower on the list at right). Continue reading →

Please add these animals to the tally

Below is a list of  vertebrate wildlife species that did not get included in Salisbury’s 2010 Wildlife Tally.  Jim Andrews thinks that these species could be found in town. If you encounter any of these animals in Salisbury in the coming years, please add them to our tally.  Some of these species are common in Salisbury and just got overlooked, but others will be very hard to find.  We hope to grow the tally from 203 species to 250 by the year 2020. Continue reading →

31 mammals found in 2010

Below is a list of the 31 species of mammals observed in Salisbury in 2010. There may be another 20 or so species of bats, shrews, moles, and rodents that live in Salisbury but were not reported in 2010 (see list here). Continue reading →

136 birds found in 2010

Below is a list of the 136 bird species observed in Salisbury in 2010. There are 50 additional species that could be seen in town, but most of those are short-term visitors (see list here).  Continue reading →

Six reptiles found in 2010

Here are the six species of reptile found in Salisbury in 2010.  There are six other species not observed that could be present here (see list here).

Animal Name Type
Common gartersnake Snakes
DeKay’s brownsnake Snakes
Milksnake Snakes
Northern watersnake Snakes
Painted turtle Turtles
Snapping turtle Turtles

16 Amphibians found in 2010

Below are the 16 species of amphibians observed in Salisbury in 2010.  We might also find two other salamanders, Jefferson salamander and mudpuppy in town.

Animal Name Type
American bullfrog Frogs
American toad Frogs
Gray treefrog Frogs
Green frog Frogs
Northern leopard frog Frogs
Pickerel frog Frogs
Spring peeper Frogs
Wood frog Frogs
Blue-spotted salamander Salamanders
Eastern newt Salamanders
Eastern red-backed salamander Salamanders
Four-toed salamander Salamanders
Northern dusky salamander Salamanders
Northern two-lined salamander Salamanders
Spotted salamander Salamanders
Spring salamander Salamanders

15 fish species found in 2010

The 15 species of fishes observed in Salisbury in 2010.  There are probably 25 other fish species in Salisbury that we did not see in 2010 (see list here).

Animal Name Type
Black crappie Bass & Sunfish
Largemouth bass Bass & Sunfish
Pumkinseed Bass & Sunfish
Rock bass Bass & Sunfish
Smallmouth bass Bass & Sunfish
Brown bullhead Catfish
Fathead minnows Minnows
Yellow perch Perch
Northern pike Pike
Atlantic salmon Salmonids
Brook trout Salmonids
Brown trout Salmonids
Lake trout Salmonids
Rainbow trout Salmonids
Rainbow smelt Smelt

2010 Wildlife Tally results

Salsibury Wildlife Tally Results

Salisbury Wildlife Tally Results

Last year, residents of Salisbury were invited to record all of their observations of vertebrate wildlife at a special page on this website.  About 40 people submitted almost 400 observations during the course of the year.  The observations included 203 different species of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.  Most of these species were birds (see figure at left).  Our tally probably did a much better job representing  birds compared to some of Salisbury’s other animals because all that flying and singing makes birds more conspicuous than the other groups.  Vermont has about 200 bird species which breed in the state, so our tally of 136 species probably missed quite a few that spend time in Salisbury.  But we might have missed even more species of fish.

Click the image to enlarge.

There are more species of fish in the world and in North America than are in any of the other vertebrate groups.  Our tally included observations of most of the important game fish in Salisbury, but probably missed many smaller species.  We also missed a few mammals, especially some mice and shrew species, but also beaver. Continue reading →

Locate and protect

Volunteers learn from each other during a training tracking session on Morgan Road.

Wildlife tracking volunteers learn from each other during a "social" tracking session on Morgan Road.

Salisbury is tucked between the Green Mountains and the Champlain Valley, and both of these landscapes have much to offer to the large wildlife species we see in town.  Moose, deer, bear, coyote, and bobcat take advantage of the unbroken forest in the mountains, but also depend on the mild climates, fertile habitats, and diverse vegetation in the valley.  In completely wild environments, the daily or seasonal migration between critical habitats follows natural corridors where travel is easy or safe.  In developed landscapes, Continue reading →

Bird Feeders are in Season for Bears

The wildlife and plant page (here) has a post about a bear that has been visiting homes between Route 7 and Lake Dunmore.  It’s a good time to take in the bird feeders so the bears don’t have a reason to linger at your house.

Lots of Energy at the Spring Fling

Gay Truax, Tom Dumont, and Dolly Dame preparing the Spring Fling meal.

Gay Truax, Tom Dumont, and Dolly Dame preparing the Spring Fling meal.

Salisbury’s Community Events Committee ran another superb event last weekend.  The Spring Fling Dinner was their third annual Green Up Day event, and has apparently become a tradition along with their summer Town Picnic and winter Holiday Tree Lighting events.   

The incredible dessert buffet at the Spring Fling.  Wow.

The incredible dessert buffet at the Spring Fling. Wow.

As always, the evening’s highlight was a sumptuous feast prepared under the talented direction of Gay Truax, with lots of expert help from Dolly Dame, Chris Sylvestri, and Mary Beth Tichacek.  There was additional support from Ken Tichacek, Tom Dumont, Lynne Pirkkanen, and excellent emcee John Nuceder.  (Login and comment below to add the people I neglected.)  This crew works really hard to organize, run, and clean up after these events, and can always use some extra hands.  Get in touch if you would like to help with the Town Picnic at Branbury Beach this summer. 
Old Bones keeps the audience entertained from the stage.

Old Bones keeps the audience entertained from the stage.

The state park is a great place to hold this event, but they need lots of help transporting everything over there and setting up.

Pat Stevenson and the three reptile and amphibian posters she won in the conservation commission raffle.

Pat Stevenson and the three reptile and amphibian posters she won in the conservation commission raffle.

The Spring Fling included lots of entertainment this year.  Chris Turner reported on Green Up Day results via a contest to see who could guess how many bags, tires, and large items had been collected so far (maybe somebody can post a final report in a comment below).  Old Bones, an excellent country and folk band of local musicians were on stage for most of the evening.  The conservation commission held a fundraising raffle of about 25 items donated for the event and raised $127 in raffle ticket sales.  Thanks everyone who donated items and all who bought tickets.

Online Auction Gets Almost 4000 Pageviews

John Beatty shows off the 18 trolling flies tied by Wally Bailey.  John outbid four other bidders to win this item for $21.50.  The wooden cigar box was an elegant extra touch by Wally.

John Beatty shows off the 18 trolling flies tied by Wally Bailey. John outbid four other bidders to win this item for $21.50. The wooden cigar box was an elegant extra touch by Wally.

Our auctions came to an end last Thursday, and we were very pleased with the results.  We were unsure about how many people would participate in our first online fundraiser, but there was lots of interest in the local items up for bid.  It looked like everyone was having fun bidding, and we appreciate your interest and support.  The final bids on the 17 items total $1071, and we thank everyone for the lively bidding.  Of course the event was only possible because our neighbors around Salisbury generously donated all of the auction items.  It’s wonderful to have such support in the community, and humbling to learn of all the talented folks who created many of the items.

Jim Eagan and the bright landscape painting by Peter Langrock he won at the online auction.

Jim Eagan and the bright landscape painting by Peter Langrock he won at the online auction.

For those of you curious about how the event progressed, here are some stats.  During the 12 days the auctions were active, more than 30 people placed 220 bids on the 17 items.  A total of 43 people registered at the auction site, but I can’t determine exactly how many of them placed bids (if your bids were always lower than the high bidder’s hidden maximum, your name was not revealed).  During the days the auctions were active, 136 different people made 456 visits to the auction Web site and viewed the 19 pages 3998 times.

A daily record of how many times the auction and main conservation commission Web sites were viewed during the online auction in April.

A daily record of how many times the auction and main conservation commission (SCC) Web sites were viewed during the online auction in April.

I have included a graph of the number of visitors (unique computers which accessed the auction Web site) and the number of visits (including the same computer returning to the site multiple times).  The graph includes several days before the auction started, and two days after it ended.  It also shows when I sent emails to our list of interested people and when an article about the auction appeared in the Addison Independent.  I was surprised to see this evidence that some people actually read my emails.

The graph also includes the visitorship to the conservation commission’s main Web site.  It looks like a few people were clicking over from the auction site while the auctions were happening.  I hope some of you continue to check this site for news of our activities (I guess you have!).

Click on the images to enlarge.